Clover Blossom Jelly (with Canning Video)

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Learn how to make a delicious jelly from clover blossoms. This Clover Blossom Jelly is sure to be a new favorite and makes a great gift.

Easy Clover Blossom Jelly made from the clovers that grow in your yard. Get the recipe!

This jelly can be made with blossoms from the Dutch white, red or crimson clover. You could also use a combination if you choose.

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When I walk around my homestead, I continually identify and learn about the plants I find growing here. Once I identify them, I then start researching what might be done with them.

Are they medicinal?

Are they edible?

Are they harmful?

There’s so much wisdom that has been lost about all of the things that grow around us.

Clover is one of those plants that many people often overlook, thinking they are just a wildflower. But you can use the blossoms to make a lovely jelly that your whole family will love.

Dutch white clovers in the yard

I often give jelly as gifts, and clover jelly is likely to be one that the recipient has never even heard of, let alone tried.

There are many flowers that you can make jelly from, like my honeysuckle or fireweed jellies.

To Make This Recipe You Will Need:

  • clover blossoms
  • boiling water
  • quart sized jar with lid
  • sugar
  • lemon juice
  • powdered pectin
  • canning jars
  • hot water bath canner or steam canner
  • canning tools
  • jelly bag or cheese cloth
  • large pot

Watch me make this recipe in the video below:

To begin, you will need to pick 2 cups of clover blossoms. Pick ones that look fresh and healthy.

picking clover blossoms near sunset

NOTE: When foraging, always be sure to pick plants that are in an area away from roads to avoid pollution, and steer clear of yards that are treated with chemicals.

Wash the blossoms with cold water, then place them in a quart mason jar or other heat-safe container.

putting clover blossoms into a mason jar

Pour in the boiling water. Close the lid and let this sit overnight to create a clover infusion.

clover blossoms in a jar creating an infusion

Prepare your canning supplies and jars. This recipe is a high acid recipe, so you can process the jars in a hot water bath canner or a steam canner.

Use a damp jelly bag or cheese cloth to strain the solids from the infusion.

jelly jar on a bowl with clover infusion behind it

You will need 2 1/4 cup of liquid. If for some reason you don’t have enough, you can add a little water to make up the difference.

Combine the clover infusion, lemon juice and powdered pectin in a large non-reactive pot.

Stir over high heat until it comes to a rolling boil. Boil for 1 minute.

Add in all of the sugar and bring it back to a boil, stirring continually. Boil hard 1 minute.

Remove it from the heat and skim off any foam.

Ladle the jelly into prepared, hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Use 8 ounce or 4 ounce jars.

clover blossom jelly being jarred

Remove any air bubbles.

Wipe the rim of the jar with a damp cloth dipped in white vinegar to remove any residue.

You May Also Like: Honeysuckle Blossom Jelly

Place a lid and ring on the jar, finger tight.

Process the jars for 10 minutes. (Adjust for elevation)

When canning in a hot water bath canner (or steam canner) always make note of the processing time. If the recipe only has one time shown, that is generally for 1-1,000 feet of elevation. Visit this article to learn how to make adjustments to the recipe for YOUR elevation: How to Adjust Canning Recipes for Altitude

Carefully transfer the jars to an out of the way place, away from drafts. I generally line the counter with a folded dish towel or use my canning mat that a subscriber made for me.

hot jelly jars on a canning mat

Allow the jars can cool undisturbed for 24 hours.

The next day remove the rings, test the seals, label the jars and store in your pantry.

If a jar didn’t seal, place it in your refrigerator to use.

Enjoy!

blossom clover jelly on toast

You May Also Like: How to Fix Runny Jelly or Jam – Set Failure

Invariably any time I make a jelly from an unusual ingredient like flowers, I am asked what it tastes like.

There’s really no explaining it. It has its own flavor. I can simply say this: It’s good!

Clover Blossom Jelly from A Good Life Farm

Give this recipe a try and see what you think of it!

Did You Make This Recipe? I would love for you to rate it in the recipe card, and I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Easy Clover Blossom Jelly made from the clovers that grow in your yard. Get the recipe!
Easy Clover Blossom Jelly made from the clovers that grow in your yard. Get the recipe!

Clover Blossom Jelly

Constance Smith – A Good Life Farm
Learn how to make a delicious and unusual jelly from the clovers that grow in your yard.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 10 mins
8 hrs
Course Food Preservation & Canning, Jelly and Jams
Cuisine American
Servings 80
Calories 41 kcal

Equipment

Ingredients
  

  • 2 c clover blossoms, white, red or crimson
  • 2 1/2 c water, boiling
  • 1/4 c lemon juice, bottled
  • 1.75 oz powdered pectin, classic
  • 4 c sugar, organic preferred

Instructions
 

  • To begin, you will need to pick 2 cups of clover blossoms. Pick ones that look fresh and healthy. (See Note)
  • Wash the blossoms with cold water, then place them in a quart mason jar or other heat-safe container. Pour in the boiling water. Close the lid and let this sit overnight to create a clover infusion.
  • Prepare your canning supplies and jars.
  • Use a jelly bag or cheese cloth to strain the solids from the infusion. You will need 2 1/4 cup of liquid. If for some reason you don't have enough, you can add a little water to make up the difference.
  • Combine the clover infusion, lemon juice and powdered pectin in a large non-reactive pot.
  • Stir over high heat until it comes to a rolling boil. Boil for 1 minute.
  • Add in all of the sugar and bring it back to a boil, stirring continually. Boil hard 1 minute.
  • Remove it from the heat and skim off any foam.
  • Ladle the jelly into prepared, hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace.
  • Remove any air bubbles.
  • Wipe the rim of the jar with a damp cloth dipped in white vinegar to remove any residue.
  • Place a lid and ring on the jar, finger tight.
  • Process the jars for 10 minutes. (Adjust for elevation)
  • Carefully removetransfer the jars to an out of the way place, away from drafts. I generally line the counter with a folded dish towel or use my canning mat that a subscriber made for me.
  • Allow the jars to cool undisturbed for 24 hours.
  • The next day remove the rings, test the seals, label the jars and store in your pantry.
  • If a jar didn't seal, place it in your refrigerator to use.
  • Enjoy!

Notes

When foraging, always be sure to pick plants that are in an area away from roads to avoid pollution, and steer clear of yards that are treated with chemicals.

Nutrition

Calories: 41kcalCarbohydrates: 11gProtein: 1gFat: 1gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 2mgPotassium: 1mgFiber: 1gSugar: 10gVitamin A: 1IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 1mgIron: 1mg

Nutritional information is auto-generated and the accuracy is not guaranteed.

Did You Try This?I’d Love For You to Share it on Instagram and tag me! @A_Good_Life_Farm

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